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« March 27, 2008 | Main | March 31, 2008 »

28 March 2008

Visualizing Data with Processing

A friend just referred me to Processing, a powerful language for visualizing data:


Processing is an open source programming language and environment for people who want to program images, animation, and interactions. It is used by students, artists, designers, researchers, and hobbyists for learning, prototyping, and production. It is created to teach fundamentals of computer programming within a visual context and to serve as a software sketchbook and professional production tool. Processing is developed by artists and designers as an alternative to proprietary software tools in the same domain.

Their exhibition shows some very impressive results. For example, I liked the visualization of the London Tube map by travel time. I lived in Russel Square once, so this invoked pleasant memories:
carden.jpg.
If you can spare a minute also take a look at the other exhibited pieces. Most are art rather than statistics. For chess friends I especially recommend the piece called "Thinking Machine 4" by Martin Wittenberg, who gave a talk at the IQSS applied stats workshop in the fall. Enjoy!

thinking.jpg.

Posted by Jens Hainmueller at 7:43 AM